Two of the award winning images from the The Wellcome Trust, TwoTen gallery, 'Truth and Beauty' exhibition, which focuses on the interaction between scientific evidence and imagery, and aesthetics.
Mark Lythgoe and Chloe Hutton  

  Parts of the brain used in recognising familiar faces

Parts of the brain used in recognising familiar faces

When you recognize a familiar face the parts of the brain highlighted in orange on this functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) light up. In this case 'lighting up' means there is increased blood flow to the areas that are working hardest. Functional MRI allows these regions to be visualized. They can then be superimposed onto a 3D reconstruction of the brain to get a precise picture of the location of those regions

Mark Lythgoe and Chloe Hutton


  Brain showing the visual cortex

Brain showing the visual cortex

The visual cortex is highlighted in this brain image created using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The surface of the brain has been expanded so the parts that are normally hidden away down the folds are 'blown out' and are shown as darker areas. The visual cortex is the part of the brain that is active when you look at something. 

Mark Lythgoe and Chloe Hutton